The murmur of the snarkmatrix…

August § The Common Test / 2016-02-16 21:04:46
Robin § Unforgotten / 2016-01-08 21:19:16
MsFitNZ § Towards A Theory of Secondary Literacy / 2015-11-03 21:23:21
Jon Schultz § Bless the toolmakers / 2015-05-04 18:39:56
Jon Schultz § Bless the toolmakers / 2015-05-04 16:32:50
Matt § A leaky rocketship / 2014-11-05 01:49:12
Greg Linch § A leaky rocketship / 2014-11-04 18:05:52
Robin § A leaky rocketship / 2014-11-04 05:11:02
P. Renaud § A leaky rocketship / 2014-11-04 04:13:09
Jay H § Matching cuts / 2014-10-02 02:41:13

Sci-fi hip-hop
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Wow, didn’t expect to find today’s music pick on the Tor blog (?!) but there it is. I like this claim:

Hip hop’s connection to science fiction goes way, way back–to these ears, it’s encoded in the genre’s DNA, thanks to its heavy sampling of P. Funk–but some groups make the connection more explicit than others (OutKast, Kanye West).

Wu-Tang, too! What is Wu-Tang if not, basically, a giant awesome science fiction project? (Actually, don’t answer that; I’m out of my depth here.)

Anyway, Tor’s Brian Slattery singles out Kid Cudi’s track The Pursuit of Happiness, and I have to concur: It’s got a really fresh sound. It’s a collaboration with MGMT and Ratatat, which sounds completely made-up—but here it is. Definitely worth a listen.

4 comments

Kinda diggin’ this whole album by Kid Cudi, by the way.

Matt Penniman says…

I’ll have to check it out. I’m reminded of my first (and so far only) hip-hop purchase: Pete Miser. “Scent of a Robot” was his classic sci-fi piece — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UW2_3rvNUL8

Excellent track. Just what I needed.

I was lucky enough to get to take a whole class on hip hop taught out of the critical studies dept of USC’s film school way back when. The most memorable class was when our professor, the unmatched Dr. Todd Boyd, walked in and said whatever he had been planning on teaching that day was off the calendar. Instead he wanted to focus the entire day’s class on the Wu-Tang Clan. And then spent two hours digging into their mythology and symbolism and made a very spot-on point that Wu Tang did for hip hop what P-Funk did for funk in the 70s. We’ll take a crazy mythology that we all love and build a whole personality around it. Space for P-Funk. Kung fu for Wu Tang.

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