The murmur of the snarkmatrix…

August § The Common Test / 2016-02-16 21:04:46
Robin § Unforgotten / 2016-01-08 21:19:16
MsFitNZ § Towards A Theory of Secondary Literacy / 2015-11-03 21:23:21
Jon Schultz § Bless the toolmakers / 2015-05-04 18:39:56
Jon Schultz § Bless the toolmakers / 2015-05-04 16:32:50
Matt § A leaky rocketship / 2014-11-05 01:49:12
Greg Linch § A leaky rocketship / 2014-11-04 18:05:52
Robin § A leaky rocketship / 2014-11-04 05:11:02
P. Renaud § A leaky rocketship / 2014-11-04 04:13:09
Jay H § Matching cuts / 2014-10-02 02:41:13

Think of This Blog as a Series of Colored Index Cards
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Conor explains the primacy of the colored index card in TV production (and includes informative stills!). Why hasn’t it been displaced by something high-tech and web-based?

At first, I was shocked that technology hadn’t killed this practice. Isn’t there some sort of wiki that we could use? A cool, iCal-looking webapp that everyone in the office could access, annotate and play with? Are leaky Sharpies and 3×5 cards really the best we can do?

Already, we use software that lets us share/edit our scripts, and I’ve been slowly getting people to use del.icio.us to share bookmarks across the office. But I don’t think I’m going to make any progress killing the wall of cards, and, the more I see it popping up other places, the less I want to.

There’s something cool about being able to look at the wall (instead of a monitor) and instantly visualize what you have coming up. But, for me, there’s something even cooler about maintaining a couple of traditions that make you feel like you belong to some larger sense of TV history — that your room of writers isn’t so different from the rooms of writers on all the shows you’ve admired growing up.

Hmm — the bit about instant visualization sounds just like the engineers and project managers over in that Edward Tufte thread we were talking about earlier. For big, shared projects, there’s still nothing better than paper pinned to the wall.

The snarkmatrix awaits you

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